2 thoughts on “BTTF Minute 101 – Emotional Math

  1. This is proof positive that Hill Valley really is just *that* small. I mean, Savannah GA is known for a lot of things, but unless you’re going downtown, everything closes around 6pm, and possibly 9pm if it’s the mall or something. Back in the ’50s, I imagine it would’ve been just like that, where no upstanding citizen has any business being out ~so late~ unless it were a real emergency. Considering that Twin Pines/Lone Pine Mall hasn’t even been built yet, and the spot where it stands is an honest-to-God farm in the ’50s, Hill Valley hasn’t expanded to start encompassing farmland. Lyon Estates is also implied to be waaaaaaay out there. If you look at a map of Savannah from the 1700s/1800s, it’s just the area where downtown sits today, and that’s only a small section of the entire metropolitan area.

    (Sorry about going on about Savannah — it’s where I live, and it’s the one place that I think about when I think of “standards for a small town” and what would be normal. Savannah likes to think it’s a city, but haha no. It’s a very small city or a very large town.)

  2. I really enjoyed this minute a lot. Talking about Marty’s “Doc!” line and the melancholy that underscores this scene hurt my heart.

    Speaking of which, you’re right–there’s a whole avalanche of emotions in this sequence beyond suspense–in part due to the opposing emotional arcs you talked about. The audience is so worried for Marty and then with Doc’s sudden calm and determinedness, there’s a quiet certainty added to the scene. And the score contributes so well; it cuts to Marty and the music is heroic and fast-paced. While at one point it goes to Doc and the soundtrack cuts out completely. It kind of gives the audience this sense of momentous purpose like, “Okay. This is happening. For real.”

    Also, the lightning strike had better look good. In the original draft it’s written as:
    “INT. DELOREAN
    THE SPEEDOMETER HITS 88!

    EXT. CLOCK TOWER
    THE MOST SPECTACULAR BOLT OF LIGHTNING IN THE HISTORY OF CINEMA STRIKES THE LIGHTNING ROD!”

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